Have a Question? 888-450-9355
Safe Drinking Water Testing

Your Public Water Has Risks

contaminants in public water are labeled safe but still have health risks.

Source: Environmental Working Group, State of American Drinking Water, 2019

%

of the total cancer risks associated with exposure to the byproducts of chlorinated water (TTHM, HAA5) are from inhalation.

Source: Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2020

Why HealthyTap?

HealthyTap was created to provide homeowners who receive water from Public Water Systems (PWS) another option for protecting water at the endpoint in their homes—at the tap.

Drinking water that meets current USEPA regulatory standards may still present risks to your health or your home’s infrastructure. So while the water may be safe, it’s not necessarily healthy.

Even if public water utilities could remove all traces of contamination, contaminants could be reintroduced as the drinking water travels through aging infrastructure to your home.

We believe you and your family deserve healthy water. This is the reason we’re obsessed with the water-health connection and providing all the information you need to protect your family’s health and quality of life.

HealthyTap and Healthy Water

Why Healthy Water is So Important

Why Healthy Water is So Important

Toxins in water can be overwhelmingly devastating for our immune systems and quality of life, especially since we need to continuously replenish water in our bodies every day. Many contaminants are colorless, odorless and tasteless, which means that we can be exposed to them over long periods of time without ever knowing it until a serious health issue arises.

Health risks associated with contaminated water are not only related to ingesting the water, but also to the inhalation and absorption of harmful chemicals when bathing or showering.

A healthy lifestyle requires healthy water!

What is Healthy Water?

Quite simply, “Healthy water does not adversely impact your family’s health.” But who determines what is a risk and what is not? The challenge is that the research on water contaminants is constantly evolving as scientists continue to learn more about their impacts on the human body.

Limits to levels of contaminants that are legally allowed in public drinking water are set by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). However, these limits are based on “maximizing health risk reduction benefits at a cost that is justified by the benefits.” In other words, when setting the limits, the USEPA must weigh the costs associated with removing contaminants from an entire community with the potential health benefits.

Individual state environmental agencies may also set lower limits, if they feel they have the scientific and cost justification to do so.  As a result, many states review the science and set allowable limits lower than the USEPA.

One of our missions at HealthyTap is to provide the tools to help consumers interpret water results and how the quality impacts their health.  Our proprietary model used to rate public water systems is based on the current science and looks at water quality from the consumer’s perspective, rather than from a public utility perspective. This process provides you with a choice: to remain with water that is safe with risks, or to choose a healthy water option that your family deserves.

We compare the water coming from your utility (using their test data) against what we have researched using many different state regulations, public health agency guidelines, and scientific papers to determine what truly is healthy water — water with no known health risks.

Safe vs. Healthy

The USEPA takes a two-step approach in setting drinking water standards for the public. First, they set a Maximum Allowable Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG). A MCLG (Public Health Goal) is a level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known risk to human health. MCLGs are non-enforceable guidelines and a target for municipalities to strive to meet.

Second, they set a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) which is an enforceable legal standard by which public water utilities are required to comply. The MCL is set as close to the MCLG as feasible, taking cost and benefits into consideration.

Healty Water Limits

The USEPA takes a two-step approach in setting drinking water standards for the public. First, they set a Maximum Allowable Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG). A MCLG (Public Health Goal) is a level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known risk to human health. MCLGs are non-enforceable guidelines and a target for municipalities to strive to meet.

Second, they set a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) which is an enforceable legal standard by which public water utilities are required to comply. The MCL is set as close to the MCLG as feasible, taking cost and benefits into consideration.

However, there are risks between the MCL and the MCLG levels. For many people, this level of risk is unknown. This is why most public water falls under the category of Safe With Risks.

Absorbing, ingesting, or inhaling water with contaminants may affect your health. The challenge for public water users is trying to understand this risk, because every contaminant affects a person’s body differently. Are you an elderly person? A woman who is pregnant? A child? Or someone with a weakened immune system? Public Water Utilities are focused on not exceeding the MCL level rather than being below the MCLG mainly due to costs for filtration and treatment technologies.

Select your town and get your rating:

Data is for Massachusetts homeowners at this time. Residential Water Score (RWS) is created using drinking water protection models developed by SafeWell Corporation. Data is based on 2020 testing data published to Massachusetts Energy and Environmental Affairs Data Portal by Community Water Systems in Massachusetts. Averages of each contaminant test were used in calculating scores. Your actual finished water may vary based on your proximity to the treatment facility and your home infrastructure. For the highest accuracy, it’s advised you test the water at your tap. Research on water contaminants is constantly evolving as scientists continue to learn more about their impacts on the human body. The Health Goals provided in our report represent the most up-to-date scientific findings and health advisories to provide you with a choice of healthy water.

We’re sorry! We have no data available for your town.

Summary of Findings

X district(s) service your town.

Showing results for X.

Click another district above to see results from that district.

Overview

Residential Water Score
No Grade Found

The Residential Water Score(RWS) represents the impact of your water quality on your family's health and your home's infrastructure.

Learn why your water received this score and how you can improve it and your water quality in the following sections.

Water Quality
No Image Found
Family Health Risk

Based on harmful contaminants identified in your drinking water.
Low

Impact on Your Home

Based on infrastructure-damaging characteristics in your water.
High

Impact on Perceived Home Value

Based on combined Family Health Risk and Impact on Your Home
Negative

Family Health Risk

Medium

Harmful contaminants identified in the drinking water

No harmful contaminants that affect your family’s health were found.

PFAS, a new and emerging contaminant, was not tested in 2020. All public water systems that have never tested for PFAS are required to test for PFAS in 2021. If you are interested in learning more, please contact us.
Arsenic
Result:0.010 mg/L
Limit:0.015 mg/L
Health Goal:0.005 mg/L
  • List of stuff

Contact Us with Questions

Home Impact

Low

Contaminants that affect your home’s infrastructure

No contaminants that significantly affect your home were found

 

Impact on Perceived Home Value

Neutral

How will the results impact your home’s perceived value?

Home buyers are savvy, health-conscious and concerned about water quality. It impacts health, safety and quality of life more than any other element in a home. Water quality problems such as foul taste or odor, harmful contaminants, corroded pipes, stained fixtures, and insufficient flow or volume reduce a home’s appeal and value, just like any other aesthetic or infrastructure problem. Buyers want to know that the water is healthy to drink, that the infrastructure is safe and sound, and —if you have a well —that there will be enough healthy water to meet the family’s needs. Homes with healthy water and a safe, sound water infrastructure have greater appeal and receive more high-end offers.

Impact on Perceived Home Value levels (rated Positive, Neutral or Negative) is based on a combination of the Family Health Risk and Infrastructure Impact Scores.

Positive — There is a low risk that water quality might adversely impact family health or damage a home’s infrastructure. Homes with healthy water quality sell for more, and they sell faster.

Neutral — Some issues in the water may impact a family’s health or damage a home’s infrastructure. Water quality is always a deciding factor for home buyers. A neutral score means water may not affect the value of the home in a positive or negative way.

Negative — Family health risk or infrastructure impacts are high (or both) which can lead to a lower perceived value and more difficulty selling a home.

Options for Healthy Water

Healthy water is achievable. Below, we’ve identified options for treating the public water you receive by removing the contaminants that pose a health risk to your family and/or impact your home’s infrastructure.

To learn more about how to reduce risks and improve your score, contact our solutions team.

Current Score & Quality

No Image Found

Healthy Water

Healthy Water Gauge

Whole-House Treatment

Point-of-Entry (POE) filtration systems remove harmful contaminants from every tap in your home, reducing health risks associated with chemical absorption, ingestion, and inhalation.

WHAT:Water Softener System
WHY:Water softener systems remove and replace hard water minerals such as magnesium, calcium, iron and manganese with sodium or potassium through an ion exchange process. Scale, clogs, stains and spotting are eliminated, and appliances operate more efficiently and last longer, saving you money.
WHAT:Neutralizer System
WHY:Acid neutralizer systems optimize the pH of highly acidic water to prevent pipe corrosion which may leach heavy metals into the drinking water, and protects plumbing and appliances from damage that could lead to costly repairs.
WHAT:Arsenic Removal System
WHY:Arsenic removal systems use a highly effective granular adsorbent that removes arsenic III & V, and a wide variety of heavy metals. The media technology utilizes a Titanium compound to adsorb both forms of arsenic as well as a wide range of contaminants in water.
WHAT:Carbon Sediment System
WHY:Carbon-based filtration (granular activated carbon/GAC or carbon block) systems trap organic chemicals (VOCs and SOCs), municipal water treatment disinfection byproducts, PFAS and pesticides through filters made of organic materials such as coal or coconut fibers. Pre-system sediment filters are needed to extend the life of the carbon system.
WHAT:Nitrate Removal System
WHY:Nitrate removal systems operate much like water softeners, using ion-exchange technology. With this type of system, chlorides are exchanged for the nitrate, and the high nitrate waste is backwashed out of the system. Similar to a water softener, salt is added to a brine tank, and the nitrate resin is regenerated automatically using a brine solution.

Point-of-Use Treatment

Point-of-Use (POU) filtration systems provide the healthiest water at your main drinking water tap and serves as a final barrier of protection eliminating the need to purchase bottled water.

WHAT:Multi-Stage Reverse Osmosis
WHY:Multi-stage reverse osmosis filtration systems remove any molecule larger than H2O, including municipal water treatment byproducts and other harmful contaminants. Foul tastes and odors are also eliminated. RO systems are compact, easy to maintain, and are typically installed at the kitchen sink.

Test your Tap Water

WHAT:Consider personally testing your own tap water for contaminants
WHY:

To truly understand the quality of the water that comes out of your tap, consider an individualized water test.

The water which leaves the treatment plant travels though miles of infrastructure [old pipes] to reach your home. That, as well as your own plumbing and fixtures can have a significant impact and change your overall water chemistry.

Contact Our Solutions Team

Keys to Interpreting the Report

Overview

Residential Water Score
No Grade Found

The Residential Water Score (RWS) represents the impact of your water quality on your family’s health and your home’s infrastructure.

Learn why your water received this score and how you can improve it and your water quality in the following sections.

Water Quality
No Image Found
Family Health Risk

Based on harmful contaminants identified in your drinking water.
Low

Impact on Your Home

Based on infrastructure-damaging characteristics in your water.
High

Impact on Perceived Home Value

Based on combined Family Health Risk and Impact on Your Home
Negative

Introducing SafeWell’s one-of-a-kind Residential Water Score (RWS) — a summary of health risks to your family and home infrastructure impacts in one convenient snapshot.

The RWS simplifies the complex task of evaluating the overall water quality of a water system, to clearly convey the impact of your water’s quality on your family’s health, your home’s infrastructure and the perceived value of your home.

The Five Components

The overall Residential Water Score (A, B, C, D) represents the impact of your water quality on your family’s health and your home’s infrastructure.

The Water Quality gauge further illustrates our assessment of whether your water quality is Healthy, Safe with Risk, or Unhealthy.

Family Health Risk (Low, Medium or High) is based on water quality parameters that represent potential health risks (e.g., arsenic).

Impact on Your Home (Low, Medium or High) is based on concerns identified in our visual and physical inspection, as well as water quality parameters that represent potential infrastructure impacts (e.g., hardness).

Impact on Perceived Home Value (Positive, Neutral or Negative) is based on a combination of the Family Health Risk and Impact on Your Home scores.

Get Healthy Water Now

    Best time to reach you?
    MorningAfternoonEvening